I was recently in Catemaco, Vercaruz and while being there I wanted to visit the waterfall Salto de Eyipantla, except I didn’t have a car and I had no idea where it was or how to get there. All I knew was that when people visit Catemaco they usually make a stop at Salto de Eyipantla. There was no clear way of learning how to get there either on the internet or IRL. So after figuring it out, I want to share how I did it so everyone can go, it’s actually pretty easy.

Also, as a side note, this area is not very common for tourists outside of Mexico. Knowing Spanish probably made things a lot easier for me but language shouldn’t stop anyone, ever!

Go to Catemaco. At the very least spend a day there, it’s beautiful and quite magical. It’s known as “Pueblo de Brujos.” I been there twice and either I spend all my time on the lake or doing nature stuff but if it wasn’t for the “Brujo” rep I would have never even noticed any sort of brujo vibes. If that is something that tickles your interest, do make a quick search, it goes way deeper than absurd witch craft misconceptions. There is some real good and valuable history in there but this post is not about that. It’s about how getting to Salto de Eyipantla.

First of all I have no idea why Salto de Eyipantla is a highlight of things to do in Catemaco. Oh wait I do actually. Most people who visit Catemaco are non foreign tourists who more than likely get there by a car or some sort of tour from Veracruz (Puerto). The waterfall from Catemaco is about 9 miles away, and with a car, that is still probably a good 30 minute drive. Short distances doesn’t always mean short travel time. With that being said I moved locations.

From Catemaco I took a bus to San Andrés TuxtlaFirst I should really explain why that was necessary. All over Mexico, no matter how small the town is, public transportation is a real thing. I wanted to somehow take direct public transportation from Catemaco to the waterfall but after talking to a few taxi drivers and people at the bus station, I was told that it didn’t exist… and if we would’ve made all the right connections, it was still too much time and we didn’t have that. However, they said somewhere in San Andres I’d be able to take a taxi collectivo that takes you directly to the town of where the waterfall is. By the way that town is called like the waterfall, Salto de Eyipantla. And a taxi collectivo is basically uber pool.

Once in San Andres I still had no clue how to get to this waterfall. We arrived early thinking we would go for sunset, at the very least. Looking back that was so naive. After walking at random, I saw a lot of taxis piled up together in a street corner and I asked if they could take me there. I was told that they can drive me to some town and from there I would have to take another taxi. It sounded like a mess and a terrible idea considering it was getting closer to sunset. One of the drivers pointed me to some other corner where I would find local buses that would take me to the Salto de Eyipantla town. With directions like “after you pass the red wall and four banks,” I got to this corner and there was no way we were going in that bus. After a terrible pizza, which by the way, how can anyone mess up a pizza? At the hotel lobby I asked some people for information and finally I had clear answers. Where the taxis leave to Salto de Eyipantla was literally a block away from the hotel. It was awesome. Next morning it finally happen.

Not being entirely sure if the new plan would work, we woke up very early, 6am. And we got to this location. Do click on the word “location” to get the exact point.

Surely enough there were taxis waiting and we hopped in. They wait until the car gets filled and then they take off.

The corner where to get the taxis
Where they wait exactly
Finally on our way
Finally on our way

After this… it’s basically cruise control. You can see on the picture above that they have a small laminated card with prices of where the taxi will stop. Nobody is being played. Everyone is very friendly and since they don’t know you they will automatically know your’e a visitor and will help you. When we got to the town the taxi driver dropped us off in the only paved road in the town and told us that if we walked down the street we will eventually run into the waterfall. It was still 7:30am, and there were a lot of kids in uniform walking to school. It reminded me how happy I am to not be in that situation, I never liked academia.

We eventually got to the entrance and for ten pesos you get a paper that allows you to the bottom and top of the waterfall.

you're in for a treat if you're holding one of these
you’re in for a treat if you’re holding one of these

To get to the bottom you have to go through all these steps. I felt like a lot of the things I read online made a big deal out of the steps… In no means am I in good shape but it wasn’t hard at all to go down or up the stairs.

THE STEPS TO THE WATERFALL
THE STEPS TO THE WATERFALL

We were the first ones there so we had the waterfall to ourselves. When you finally get to the actual river this happens.

SALTO DE EYIPANTLA
SALTO DE EYIPANTLA

They have this balcony thing near where the water first falls but you will get completely wet and muddy.

YOU CAN GET REALLY CLOSE TO THE WATERFALL
YOU CAN GET REALLY CLOSE TO THE WATERFALL

Eventually we made it back to the top of the stairs. You can view the waterfall from the top but in order to do so you cross over this suspension bridge.

STEP HARD ENOUGH AND OTHER PEOPLE ON THE BRIDGE WILL MOVE
STEP HARD ENOUGH AND OTHER PEOPLE ON THE BRIDGE WILL MOVE

Pass the bridge and some playground for kids you get to the observation deck.

top of salto de eyipantla
top of salto de eyipantla

When you finally leave, there will be people from each restaurant trying to get you to eat at their restaurant. We just said yes to the second person and ended up here.

RESTAURANT AT SALTO DE EYIPANTLA
RESTAURANT AT SALTO DE EYIPANTLA

Two young girls prepared our food in front of us while the only man around went to make freshly squeeze orange juice and brought us a coke.

FOOD AFTER THE WATERFALL
FOOD AFTER THE WATERFALL

To get back to San Andres was a breeze. We walked back to where the taxi dropped us off. From there, three different people told us to walk to the park. With just finger pointing instructions we arrived at the park and we took one of the 20 taxis that were there waiting. At this point the weather had turn from very comfortable and breezy to feeling like we were on top of a giant boiling pot.

All the troubles to get here were well worth it. I took a million photos and snapchat it like if I worked for CNN and on top of that took a lot of video. I literally just stood there looking at this thing, trying to take it all in without looking at it through a glass screen. The whole time I just kept thinking how good of a decision it was to stick to coming here.

I hope this helps and maybe motivates you to visit Salto de Eyipantla someday soon.

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